• Cultures: 
    • Tlingit, 
    • Haida, 
    • Kwakiutl 
    • (Kwakwaka' wakw)
    • FOR TEST: 
    • NATIVE AMERICANS of NORTH WEST COAST
  • Region: The American Northwest Coast (Alaska, Canada, and Washington State)

 
 



 


 


 


 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 


 
Tlingit Clan House

 
Tlingit, Grizzly Bear House
-partition screen 
c 1840 cedar paint and human hair 
15'x8'

 
 

Kwakiutl Culture, Photos of Dance Feast, Dance Societies of the Hamatsa,
 

potlatch
1. (among American Indians of the northern Pacific coast, especially the Kwakiutl) a ceremonial festival at which gifts are bestowed on the guests and property is destroyed by its owner in a show of wealth that the guests later attempt to surpass.
2. Pacific Northwest . a party or celebration.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Kwakiutl Culture
Photos of Dance Feast, 
Dance Societies of the Hamatsa Potlatch

Hamatsa Emerging from the Woods (1914) Photogravure

 
 
 
Hamatsa Emerging from the Woods (1914)

 
 
 

The figure illustrated here depicts a hamatsa (an initiate of special society that does the hamatsa dance) who has become possessed by supernatural forces after spending many days in the woods as part of the hamatsa initiation ceremony.

Tlingit, Grizzly Bear House
-partition screen 
c 1840 cedar paint and human hair 
15'x8'

 
Bookwus,(Bakwas) the Wildman of the Woods, is a supernatural character who lives on the edge of the forest near the ocean shore. He lurks at the mouths of creeks where he entices the souls of drowned humans, persuading them with ghost food to come and live with him. He lives in an invisible house in the woods where he communicated with the dead and brought them back to life during the winter dance season.

 
Bukwas- Wild Man of the Woods Mask- by Henderson, Greg


Title  Bukwas (Bookwus) 


Region/Country  NW Coast America 


period/style name  NATIVE AMERICANS of NORTH WEST COAST


approximate dates  c. 20th Century



 
period, style, culture, civilization

Historic Era Neolithic Technology Cultures

1125-1200 CE Ansazi
1300-Present  Navajo, Hopi, Zuni,
1300?- Present Kwakiutl, Tlingit, Haida


 
 
 

Photos of Dance Feast, 
Dance Societies of the Hamatsa

Gwaxwiwe' Hamsiwe'
Raven Man-eater Forehead mask
Kwakwaka'wakw, Kwagu'l band
Mungo Martin, ca. 1940 
Red cedar, red cedar bark, enamel

 
 
 
 
 
Tsonokwa Transformation Mask 
c1980  by Simon James 
Kwakiutl (Kwakwaka'wakw)
Hand carved and painted red cedar 
15" x 9" x 8 1/2"

 
 
 
 


Tsonokwa Feast Dish 8 meters long, carved wood, Salish or Kwakiutl
NATIVE AMERICANS of NORTH WEST COAST

By Kwakwaka'wakw artist Calvin Hunt. About 8 metres long, it rivals in size the large, traditional feast dishes. The food at feasts was often placed in a large dish carved in the form of an animal or supernatural being. The abdomen of the Tsonoqua is the main part of the feast dish, while the face can be removed to reveal another dish. Associated with the feast dish are six small bowls, in the form of red  snappers, seals and frogs, which, when the dish is completely assembled, rest on the knees and other parts of Tsonoqua's body.

 

Grease dish in form of a boat with 
animal head, circa1900
wood, opercula, trade beads, and 
abalone
24 1/4 x 9 (61.6 x 22.9 cm) inches
NATIVE AMERICANS of NORTH WEST COAST

Anthropomorphic Bowl c1900

animorphic
zoomorphic
anthropomorphic


 

 


Chilkat blanket, 19th century mountain
goat wool, cedar bark and sinew thread
51 x 64 (129.5 x 162.6 cm) inches
NATIVE AMERICANS of NORTH WEST COAST



 
 
 
 
 
 


Front

Side
Probably Haida, Possibly Kwakiutl (Knifehandle?)
19th Century, ivory, pearl, shell, wood,
Ht 4 1/8 width 1 5/8
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tell me what you know.

I am your little brother who knows nothing.

We have just walked into the Museum of Natural History in New York and you want to share some culture with me.

I'd much rather go see the Yankees.

What will you tell me about these things that will get me interested in looking at these exhibits?

We walk into the entrance and the first things you see are these big boats.  What can you tell me?
 

Huh?